Volume 5 Supplement 1

Proceedings of the Fifth International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) Conference and Expo

Open Access

Effects of ingesting a thermogenic/anti-inflammatory supplement while participating in a resistance training program on indices of body composition and metabolic, cardiovascular, muscular, and hemodynamic function in overweight females

  • Erika Nassar1Email author,
  • Jen Morellion1,
  • Geoffrey Hudson1,
  • Brian Shelmadine1,
  • Julie Culbertson1,
  • Thomas Buford1,
  • Richard Kreider1 and
  • Darryn Willoughby1
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition20085(Suppl 1):P25

https://doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-5-S1-P25

Published: 17 September 2008

Background

Sedentary, healthy, overweight women (n = 40) participated in a full-body resistance training program 3 days/week. The study was performed in a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled fashion.

Methods

Participants followed a structured, energy-restricted, low glycemic diet. Participants ingested either 250 mg of a thermogenic/anti-inflammatory supplement or a 250 mg placebo supplement. Body composition, performance variables, serum lipid variables, inflammation markers, obesity markers and GLUT4 values were obtained at week 0 and after weeks 4 and 8. Data were analyzed by repeated measures MANOVA and are presented as means ± SD. GLUT 4 values were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA are presented as means ± SD.

Results

Body weight reduction was significant between weeks 0 and 8 for both groups (88.45 ± 19.33 vs. 86.26 ± 19.17, p = 0.000). BMI also had significant decreases in both groups between weeks 0 and 8 (33.21 ± 7.77 vs. 32.32 ± 7.76, p = 0.000). Fat mass decreased significantly for both groups between weeks 0 and 8 (37.88 ± 13.04 vs. 36.18 ± 12.47, p = 0.034). There was a significant decrease in waist measurements for both groups between weeks 0 and 8 in both groups (36.54 ± 5.86 vs. 35.44 ± 5.67, p = 0.000). Relative leg press strength increased in both groups between weeks 0 and 8 (2.22 ± 0.62, p = 0.000). In addition, relative bench press strength increased in both groups between week 0 and 8 (0.38 ± 0.10 vs. 0.435 ± 0.11, p = 0.000). For serum lipid values, there was a significant time effect for TCHOL, LDL, and HDL. TCHOL decreased between weeks 0 and 8 (187.51 ± 26.45 vs. 173.97 ± 28.60, p = 0.004). LDL decreased between weeks 0 and 8 (111.62 ± 22.18 vs. 104.95 ± 23.81, p = 0.048). HDL decreased between weeks 0 and 8 (56.46 ± 10.67 vs. 51.82 ± 11.52, p = 0.009). For insulin resistance markers there was a significant time effect for insulin and HOMA IR values. Insulin decreased between week 0 and 8 (257.1 ± 229.7 vs. 179.3 ± 127.7, p = 0.023). HOMA IR decreased between week 0 and 8 (2.9 ± 2.5 vs. 2.1 ± 1.4, p = 0.044). Ghrelin significantly increased in the experimental group between week 0 and 8 (480.61 ± 197.58 vs. 551.46 ± 224.81, p = 0.007). Overall leptin concentrations decreased significantly between week 0 and 8 in both groups (21367.6 ± 10954.7 vs. 16794.7 ± 10966.3, p = 0.019). There was a mild trend for a decrease in adiponectin concentrations between week 0 and 4 (11380.51 ± 5234.17 vs. 10370.94 ± 4803.42, p = 0.081). In terms of inflammation markers ILIβ were all below detectable levels. In addition, there were no significant effects for TNFα and IL6. GLUT4 data showed no significant effects. Caloric intake for both groups decreased significantly between week 0 and 8 (1820.73 ± 479.83 vs. 1279.45 ± 386.54, p = 0.000). Fat intake decreased significantly for both groups between weeks 0 and 8 (73.26 ± 21.19 vs. 43.69 ± 17.66, p = 0.000). Carbohydrate intake was reduced significantly in both groups between week 0 and 8 (222.92 ± 79.38 vs. 173.16 ± 58.23, p = 0.001). Sugar intake also decreased for both group significantly between week 0 and 8 (76.55 ± 44.49 vs. 53.48 ± 22.02, p = 0.004).

Conclusion

Results indicate that a full body resistance training program, in combination with an energy-restricted, low glycemic diet may help promote weight loss and strength gains.

Declarations

Acknowledgements

Supported by a research grant from Unigen Pharmaceuticals (Lacey, WA).

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Exercise & Biochemical Nutrition Lab, Baylor University

Copyright

© Nassar et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2008

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd.