Volume 12 Supplement 1

Proceedings of the Twelfth International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) Conference and Expo

Open Access

Effects of 8 weeks of Stealth® supplementation on body composition, muscle strength and mass, markers of satellite cell activation, and clinical safety markers in males

  • Micheil B Spillane1,
  • Neil A Schwarz1 and
  • Darryn S Willoughby2
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition201512(Suppl 1):P9

https://doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-12-S1-P9

Published: 21 September 2015

Purposes

This study determined the effect of 8 weeks of heavy resistance exercise combined with oral ingestion of either a placebo or Stealth® dietary supplement on body composition, muscle strength and mass, hemodynamics, myofibrillar protein content, serum (IGF-1, HGF, GH), muscle total DNA content, c-Met, and the myogenic regulatory factors (Myo-D, Myogenin, MRF-4).

Methods

Twenty non-resistance-trained males were randomly matched by age and body mass in a double-blind fashion being assigned to either a placebo (maltodextrose) or Stealth® group. Testing was conducted at baseline (day 0) followed by 8 weeks of a periodized 4-day per week resistance training program of 3 × 10 reps at 70-80% of their 1-RM. The program was split into two upper and two lower extremity workouts per week with post testing occurring at (day 57). Both groups consumed 2 servings (312g) (1248 kcals) per day. During exercise sessions the placebo group consumed (156g) of maltodextrose 30 min before and after exercise. The Stealth® group consumed (22g fat, 158g carbohydrates, 94g protein). During non-training days both groups consumed the 2 servings in the morning upon waking. Both the placebo and Stealth® groups consumed an isocaloric diet (~2500 kcals) and the additional (1,248 kcals) for a total of (~3750 kcals) each day. Data were analyzed with separate 2 × 2 factorial analyses of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures (p < 0.05).

Results

For dietary intake, there were no significant differences in total calories (p = 0.346), protein (p = 0.689), and fat (p = 0.275) between testing sessions. A significant difference in carbohydrate (p = 0.003) between testing session was shown, but no difference (p = 0.737) between groups was observed. Hemodynamic measurement between testing session for resting heart rate (p = 0.208) and SBP (p = 0.192) were not significant between testing sessions. However, DBP (p = 0.047) was significant but no differences (p = 0.686) between groups were observed. A significant increase in body mass (p = 0.001), body water (p = 0.001), body fat % (p = 0.001), and fat mass (p = 0.001) were shown between testing sessions. Only body water was significantly (p = 0.030) greater within the stealth® group. No significant difference in fat free mass (p = 0.068) was shown between testing session for either group. A significant difference in upper body strength (p = 0.024) and lower body strength (p = 0.001) was shown between testing sessions for both groups. However, no significant difference between upper body (p = 0.989) and lower body (p = 0.097) strength was observed between the supplement groups. Serum IGF-1 (p = 0.270), HGF (p = 0.070), and GH (p = 0.397) were not significantly different between testing sessions. No significant difference between testing sessions for myofibrillar protein (p = 0.108), total DNA (p = 0.217), Myo-D (p = 0.093), and Myogenin (p = 0.070) were observed. A significant difference between testing session in c-MET (p = 0.023) and MRF-4 (p = 0.044) were shown. Only the placebo (p = 0.047) group was < Stealth® for c-Met.

Conclusions

Heavy resistance training with a high caloric proprietary blend weight gain dietary supplement does not improve markers for skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Significant increases in body mass, fat mass and body fat % were shown for both placebo and Stealth®.

Declarations

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by a research grant from VPX, awarded to Baylor University.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Health, Physical Education and Leisure Studies, University of South Alabama
(2)
Exercise and Biochemical Nutrition Lab, Department of Health, Human Performance, and Recreation, Baylor University

Copyright

© Spillane et al. 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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