Volume 11 Supplement 1

Proceedings of the Eleventh International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) Conference and Expo

Open Access

The effect of moderate- and high-intensity interval training on substrate oxidation and nutrient preferences in obese men

Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition201411(Suppl 1):P7

https://doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-11-S1-P7

Published: 1 December 2014

Background

This study compared the influence of 12 sessions of moderate- and high-intensity interval training on substrate oxidation and nutrient preferences.

Methods

Ten obese men participated in cross-over 4-week moderate- (MIIT) and high- (HIIT) intensity interval cycling. MIIT consisted of 5-min stages at ±20% of mechanical work at 45 %VO2peak, and HIIT consisted of 30-sec work at 90 %VO2peak and 30-sec rests for 30-45 min. The assessments included a constant-load test consisted of 5-min rest, 45-min cycling at 45 %VO2peak followed by 60-min recovery. Intermittent measures of gas exchange using indirect calorimetry were undertaken, and ad libitum meal was provided after the test. Consent to publish the results was obtained from all participants.

Results

Changes in fat oxidation were +19% at rest, +96% during exercise and +59% during recovery in MIIT, and were -7% at rest, +43% during exercise and -13% during recovery in HIIT. Changes in CHO oxidation were +6% at rest, -13% during exercise and -2% during recovery in MIIT, and were +46% at rest, -7% during exercise and +32% during recovery in HIIT. The amount of meal, fat and CHO eaten decreased by 24, 16 and 13% respectively after HIIT, and increased by 3, 38 and 14% respectively after MIIT. The intervention explained 12.4% of the changes in fat intake (p = 0.07). The interaction of fat oxidation*intervention did not significantly explain the change in fat eaten (p>0.05).

Conclusion

The change in fat oxidation did not explain the change in fat eaten after interval training.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
University of Dammam

Copyright

© Alkahtani; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Advertisement