Volume 11 Supplement 1

Proceedings of the Eleventh International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) Conference and Expo

Open Access

The effects of ketogenic dieting on skeletal muscle and fat mass

  • Jacob T Rauch1,
  • Jeremy E Silva1,
  • Ryan P Lowery1,
  • Sean A McCleary1,
  • Kevin A Shields1,
  • Jacob A Ormes1,
  • Matthew H Sharp1,
  • Steven I Weiner1,
  • John I Georges,1,
  • Jeff S Volek2,
  • Dominic P D’agostino3 and
  • Jacob M Wilson1Email author
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition201411(Suppl 1):P40

DOI: 10.1186/1550-2783-11-S1-P40

Published: 1 December 2014

Background

Very low carbohydrate (<5 %), high fat (>70 %) ketogenic diets (VLCKD) diets have previously been shown to have favorable changes in body composition (increased lean mass and decreased fat mass) in obese or overweight individuals. However, the impact of this form of dieting relative to a traditional high carbohydrate diet has not yet been investigated in resistance trained athletes. PURPOSE: Therefore the purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of VLCKD verses a traditional western diet on changes in muscle and fat mass.

Methods

Twenty-six college aged resistance trained men volunteered to participate in this study and were divided into VLCKD (5 % CHO, 75 % Fat, 20 % Pro) or a traditional western diet (55 % CHO, 25 % fat, 20 % pro). All subjects participated in a periodized resistance-training program three times per week. Body fat and lean mass were determined via dual xray absorptiometry (DXA), while muscle mass was determined via ultrasonography analysis of the quadriceps. All measures were taken at week 0 and 11. Consent to publish the results was obtained from all participants.

Results

Lean body mass increased to a greater extent in the VLCKD (4.3 ± 1.7 kgs ) as compared to the traditional group (2.2 kg ± 1.7). Ultrasound determined muscle mass increased to a greater extent in the VLCKD group (0.4 ± 0.25 cm) as compared to the traditional western group (0.19 ± 0.26 cm). Finally fat mass decreased to a greater extent in the VLCKD group (-2.2 kg ± 1.2 kg) as compared to the (- 1.5 ± 1.6 kg).

Conclusions

These results indicate that VLCKD may have more favorable changes in LBM, muscle mass, and body fatness as compared to a traditional western diet in resistance trained males.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
The University of Tampa
(2)
The Ohio State University
(3)
University of South Florida

Copyright

© Rauch et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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